Nutritional Risk Assessment of Eleven Minerals and Trace Elements: Prevalence of Inadequate and Excessive Intakes from the Second French Total Diet Study

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Esther Kalonji
Véronique Sirot
Laurent Noel
Thierry Guerin
Irène Margaritis
Jean-Charles Leblanc

Abstract

Aims: Adequate coverage of nutrient requirements is a real health concern and surveillance of the nutritional status of a population is a key element for public policies. This study aimed at providing a reliable nutritional risk assessment of the French population based on prevalences of inadequate and excessive intakes of eleven minerals and trace elements.

Methodology: Intakes from foods (dietary supplements excluded) were estimated by combining composition data from the second national Total Diet Study (TDS2/2007-2009) and consumption data from the Individual and National Study on Food Consumption.  Results were compared with those from other TDSs.

Results: Sodium intakes exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) guidance values, respectively for 74% of adults, and for 76% of children. For calcium and magnesium, the prevalence of inadequate intakes in adults and children ranged from approximately 50 to 70% to over 80% in teenagers. Prevalences of inadequacy were 13% in adults and 18% in children for selenium, and 40% in children and 74% in 16-17 year-old girls for iron.

Conclusion: These substantial risks of inadequate intakes should be considered in the light of nutritional status biomarkers. Furthermore, effort to reduce excessive intakes of sodium in the French population should be maintained.

Keywords:
Minerals, trace elements, total diet study, prevalence of inadequacy.

Article Details

How to Cite
Kalonji, E., Sirot, V., Noel, L., Guerin, T., Margaritis, I., & Leblanc, J.-C. (2015). Nutritional Risk Assessment of Eleven Minerals and Trace Elements: Prevalence of Inadequate and Excessive Intakes from the Second French Total Diet Study. European Journal of Nutrition & Food Safety, 5(4), 281-296. https://doi.org/10.9734/EJNFS/2015/18193
Section
Original Research Article